Alaska Family Law

  1. Divorce

    The following sections are included because it may often be the case that a victim of an online privacy invasion has recently divorced the perpetrator spouse, or is considering a divorce or possibly a separation. Although evidence of misconduct is not appropriate in a divorce proceeding, the publication of sex photos/videos may well be considered in child custody proceedings.

    1. Divorce

      1. Introduction

        Alaska permits divorce based on eight grounds.

      2. Text of Statute(s)

        AS § 25.24.050 - Grounds for divorce

          A divorce may be granted for any of the following grounds:

            (1) failure to consummate the marriage at the time of the marriage and continuing at the commencement of the action;

            (2) adultery;

            (3) conviction of a felony;

            (4) wilful desertion for a period of one year;

            (5) either

            (A) cruel and inhuman treatment calculated to impair health or endanger life;

            (B) personal indignities rendering life burdensome; or

            (C) incompatibility of temperament;

            (6) habitual gross drunkenness contracted since marriage and continuing for one year prior to the commencement of the action;

            (7) Repealed.

            (8) incurable mental illness when the spouse has been confined to an institution for a period of at least 18 months immediately preceding the commencement of the action; the status as to the support and maintenance of the mentally ill person is not altered in any way by the granting of the divorce;

            (9) addiction of either party, subsequent to the marriage, to the habitual use of opium, morphine, cocaine, or a similar drug.

        AS 25.24.140 - Orders during action

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  2. Child Custody

    1. Introduction

    2. Text of Statute(s)

      AS § 25.25.150 - Judgments for Custody

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        (c) The court shall determine custody in accordance with the best interests of the child under AS 25.20.060 - 25.20.130. In determining the best interests of the child the court shall consider

          (1) the physical, emotional, mental, religious, and social needs of the child;

          (2) the capability and desire of each parent to meet these needs

          (3) the child's preference if the child is of sufficient age and capacity to form a preference;

          (4) the love and affection existing between the child and each parent;

          (5) the length of time the child has lived in a stable, satisfactory environment and the desirability of maintaining continuity;

          (6) the willingness and ability of each parent to facilitate and encourage a close and continuing relationship between the other parent and the child, except that the court may not consider this willingness and ability if one parent shows that the other parent has sexually assaulted or engaged in domestic violence against the parent or a child, and that a continuing relationship with the other parent will endanger the health or safety of either the parent or the child;

          (7) any evidence of domestic violence, child abuse, or child neglect in the proposed custodial household or a history of violence between the parents;

          (8) evidence that substance abuse by either parent or other members of the household directly affects the emotional or physical well-being of the child;

          (9) other factors that the court considers pertinent.

        (d) In awarding custody the court may consider only those facts that directly affect the well-being of the child.

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        (g) There is a rebuttable presumption that a parent who has a history of perpetrating domestic violence against the other parent, a child, or a domestic living partner may not be awarded sole legal custody, sole physical custody, joint legal custody, or joint physical custody of a child.

        (h) A parent has a history of perpetrating domestic violence under (g) of this section if the court finds that, during one incident of domestic violence, the parent caused serious physical injury or the court finds that the parent has engaged in more than one incident of domestic violence. The presumption may be overcome by a preponderance of the evidence that the perpetrating parent has successfully completed an intervention program for batterers, where reasonably available, that the parent does not engage in substance abuse, and that the best interests of the child require that parent's participation as a custodial parent because the other parent is absent, suffers from a diagnosed mental illness that affects parenting abilities, or engages in substance abuse that affects parenting abilities, or because of other circumstances that affect the best interests of the child.

        (i) If the court finds that both parents have a history of perpetrating domestic violence under (g) of this section, the court shall either

          (1) award sole legal and physical custody to the parent who is less likely to continue to perpetrate the violence and require that the custodial parent complete a treatment program; or

          (2) if necessary to protect the welfare of the child, award sole legal or physical custody, or both, to a suitable third person if the person would not allow access to a violent parent except as ordered by the court.

        (j) If the court finds that a parent has a history of perpetrating domestic violence under (g) of this section, the court shall allow only supervised visitation by that parent with the child, conditioned on that parent's participating in and successfully completing an intervention program for batterers, and a parenting education program, where reasonably available, except that the court may allow unsupervised visitation if it is shown by a preponderance of the evidence that the violent parent has completed a substance abuse treatment program if the court considers it appropriate, is not abusing alcohol or psychoactive drugs, does not pose a danger of mental or physical harm to the child, and unsupervised visitation is in the child's best interests.

        (k) The fact that an abused parent suffers from the effects of the abuse does not constitute a basis for denying custody to the abused parent unless the court finds that the effects of the domestic violence are so severe that they render the parent unable to safely parent the child.

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